Are you measurement ready?

When you need to be measurement ready

There are two key roll out dates for the policy depending on storage amount and frequency of use:

  • 1 July 2021: 1,000 ML or greater and used more frequently than one in seven years on average
  • 1 July 2022: Less than 1,000 ML or 1,000 ML or greater and used less frequently than one in seven years on average

Steps to become measurement ready

To help you, the department is developing a measurement-ready program with fact sheets and guidelines to get you there on time. These resources will provide you with a roadmap for understanding your path to being measurement-ready and will be updated regularly on the department’s website.

In order to comply with the policy, you will need to have installed and functioning equipment by the key roll out dates listed above.

The checklist below will help you to understand the key steps.

What you need How do I do this?
1. A surveyed benchmark

You must have a survey benchmark installed by a surveyor near the site of the storage meter.

The department has published a guideline to assist surveyors installing benchmarks.

2. A secondary (backup) measurement device
  • This will allow you to floodplain harvest if you don’t need to comply with the measurement policy until 1 July 2022, but want to take floodplain water after 1 July 2021, or
  • If you want to be able to take floodplain water if your primary measurement device fails.

The department encourages you to install a secondary (backup) measurement device with your survey benchmark.

The department has published a guideline to assist with installation.

3. A compliant storage meter

You must have a storage meter that meets the minimum specifications installed and validated by a duly qualified person.

A list of storage meters that meet the minimum specification is available on the department’s website.

Irrigation Australia Limited, which oversees certified meter installers, is delivering a certification program for storage meter installers.

4. A compliant local intelligence device (LID)

You must have a telemetry-enabled data logger (known as a LID) that meets the minimum specifications, installed and connected to the government’s telemetry system by a duly qualified person.

A list of LIDs that meet the minimum specifications is available on the department’s website.

Guidelines

The following guidelines are now available for water users to assist with installing their measurement systems:

Further ‘how to’ resources will be made available on the website to ensure water users understand what they need to do to comply with the rules.

Compliance

NRAR is responsible for overseeing compliance with the NSW Floodplain Harvesting Measurement Policy. WaterNSW will manage the accounting and billing associated with floodplain harvesting.

Watch the video below, NRAR's approach to floodplain harvesting compliance.